Revd Malcolm Hugh Wainwright
The Rectory, Church Lane
Skelton, York
01904 471351
Revd Anna Lindley
07714 325929

You're welcome to marry in church whatever your beliefs, whether or not you are christened and whether or not you regularly go to church. And, marrying in church has never been easier.

You can marry in a church! You're welcome to marry in the Church of England whatever your beliefs, whether or not you are christened and regardless of whether you go to church or not. It's your church, and we welcome you! A complication will only arise if one of you has been married before, or, if one of you is a foreign national, but there may still be a way forward.

Read more about marriage after divorce or advice for foreign nationals. It is your Vicar's duty to marry you, but also their privilege. When you choose to marry in a church, you are the hosts and the church is your guest. If you invite us to be part of your wedding, we would be delighted to accept. And for such a special day, we offer a special place.

Special day, special place.

We want to make your wedding personal and memorable for you. Churches are special places and there are some things about a church wedding that you just can't get anywhere else. A church wedding will add a spiritual dimension to your marriage. The ceremony includes God and looks to him for help and guidance. God's blessing is the main attraction for many couples, whatever their beliefs. You can make amazing vows, or promises, in a church. You can only make vows this big in a church. These vows, made in public, will help you to stay together and grow together. God and your church are there for you to help you keep your vows.

The Vicar has a very particular role to play in your wedding. They can blend ancient tradition and modern experience to reflect your story. Because of the relationship with the Vicar, your wedding can be made personal, memorable, meaningful and beautiful.

In Church it's marriage in the eyes of God, which makes the commitment a bit stronger, I mean not in yourselves, it doesn't change your feelings, but for some reason it puts that cloud over you– not a nasty cloud, a different cloud. It's more than legal. It's different - it's proper. Church buildings offer outstanding beauty.

Old or new, intimate or grand, our 16,000 churches are some of the nation's most stunning wedding venues, with two-thirds being listed buildings. Church buildings offer centuries of history. Imagine all the couples who have married in your local church, some of whom may well be your family. You can feel you're becoming part of history itself, the bigger plan, by marrying in the same place as your relatives.

We know these sorts of connections can make your day even more special. Read more about how much easier it is to marry in your special church, wherever that may be. For some people, a church simply seems like the proper place to get married. Churches can be described as 'peaceful', 'serene', or having an atmosphere that makes marrying there a particularly special experience.

A funeral is used to mark the end of a person's life here on earth. Family and friends come together to express grief, give thanks for the life lived and commend the person into God's keeping. These can be a small, quiet ceremony or a large occasion in a packed church. Everyone is entitled to either a burial service (funeral) or to have their ashes buried in their local parish churchyard by their local parish priest regardless of whether they attended church or not. Speak to your local vicar for more information, or, if you do not know who your local vicar is please use the search box on the right to find your local Church of England church. If the churchyard has been closed, then the Local Authority will provide alternative places of burial and the minister can carry out the service there instead of the church or crematorium. 

Q. What's the difference between a baptism and a christening?

A. None, they are just different words for the same thing.

Q. Can we have a private service of baptism?

A. Baptisms usually take place in the church's main service, because they are a public declaration that your child has become part of the church family. It is important that the church congregation is there to support you and welcome your child. However, if personal circumstances make this difficult, talk your parish priest.

Q. What is the right age for baptism?

A. Baptism can happen at any age. What matters is that those concerned are committed to bring up a child as a Christian.

Teenagers and adults may also be baptized. This is celebrated with confirmation by the Bishop. You can only be baptised once, but there are ways of renewing your Christian commitment publicly as an adult - your priest will be able to advise you.

Q. I'm not a regular churchgoer. Can I still have my child baptized?

A. Yes. The Church believes that God's love is available to all, regardless of their background. Your parish priest can talk you through the options: you might prefer to have a Thanksgiving service first and then consider baptism when you have had time to talk through what is being asked of you.

You may also wish to find out more about the Christian faith and what joining the Church involves before you make a decision about baptism. Again, your parish priest can give you guidance.

Q. What does it cost?

A. A Baptism service is free, though there may be a small charge for a certificate. Ask your parish priest.