Revd Malcolm Hugh Wainwright
The Rectory, Church Lane
Skelton, York
01904 471351
Revd Anna Lindley
07714 325929

 

What does being a godparent involve?

It feels like a big responsibility . . .

I'm not sure I can make these decisions. What if I've not thought much about my faith and don't go to church regularly?

Does being a godparent mean I'm a legal guardian as well?

I'm worried about doing the right thing on the day.

What should I give as a present?

What happens in the baptism service?

After the baptism service

Building a relationship with your godchild

Growing in faith: confirmation

A prayer for godparents

A prayer for your godchild

As a godparent, you have a special role. It's about helping a child to come to know God, encouraging them in their spiritual life and supporting them in their membership of the local church.

You will be expected to be attend the child's baptism, where you will make promises to help to bring them up in the Christian faith.

It's a role that will develop over time, as your godchild grows up and develops their own faith.

It is. Have a look at the questions you will answer in the baptism service. Take some time to think through the commitments you make when you answer them. But don't forget that the Church can support you in encouraging and praying for your godchild.

Most people have doubts at some stage, and no one's asking you to be perfect.

However, being asked to be a godparent is a good opportunity to think about your own faith.

Godparents must have been baptized themselves, and it's best if you are also confirmed. Baptism or confirmation preparation can help you with your own questions about the Christian faith. It will also help you to support your godchild in developing their own faith. If you have any questions at all, why not speak to your parish priest or another Christian you know.

No. Your role as godparent is a spiritual one - to encourage and pray for your godchild. Perhaps you will be asked to be a guardian too, but that is separate from being a godparent.

The priest will make sure the service goes smoothly and that everyone knows what to do and when. Why not ask if there's a rehearsal or any other preparation you could get involved in?

The most important gifts you can give your godchild are your time, presence and prayers, but you will probably also want to mark the baptism or confirmation by giving a special gift.

Godparents don't have to buy expensive gifts. A simple, meaningful present is a good choice - maybe something to be used at the baptism, or a gift to be kept for later.

Here are some suggestions. You'll find many of these at Christian bookshops and cathedral gift shops. Or ask your minister for details of local suppliers.

Bibles:

There are many different editions of the Bible. Some have pictures and simple language especially for children. Some have presentation boxes. It's worth asking the parents if there's a version they prefer. Perhaps you'll decide on a children's Bible at baptism and an adult edition as a confirmation present.

Books of Bible stories:

There are some lovely illustrated books of Bible stories for children. Why not build up a series over the next few years? You can always ask bookshops for advice on age-appropriate titles.

Books of prayers:

You'll find a wide variety available, including illustrated and gift book styles.

A silver or gold cross or chain (remember that your godchild won't be able to wear this for some time).

A small wooden cross

Drawings, paintings and posters of Christian stories

An icon or picture

Baptisms normally take place during a Sunday morning service, so the church congregation can welcome the child into the Church and declare their intention to support and pray for the child, parents and godparents.

When it comes to the baptism itself, the priest asks the parents and godparents to bring the child to the front of the church or gather around the font.

Before the baptism, the priest asks you to declare that you intend to do your best as a godparent. The priest asks you to say that you're 'prepared to walk with [the child] in the way of Christ' and will 'help them take their place within the life and worship of Christ's Church'.

Remember, if you've any doubts you can always discuss them with your priest.

The Church may give you a special card to remind you of your godchild's baptism and the promises you have made. Keep it somewhere you'll see it every day, so you remember your godchild each day and ask God to bless them daily as they grow up. Why not keep an up-to-date photograph alongside the card?

You're a godparent. Now what? Both you and your godchild will get far more out of this relationship if you can keep it alive.

Children love to get letters, postcards and emails. Why not send a card or small gift on the anniversary of the baptism, to show you care about them and to remind you both of what's special about this relationship.

Keep in touch regularly as they grow up. Perhaps when they're older, they'll want to ask questions about faith or Christian life. If you've kept in touch, they might be able to ask you - and that's something special.

Hopefully, later on your godchild will want to make his or her own declaration of faith at a confirmation service. Confirmation is an important occasion. Your godchild confirms the promises you made for them at the baptism service and the bishop leading the service prays for God's Holy Spirit to rest upon your godchild.

Before their confirmation, they attend a series of classes or meetings at their local church or school. They discuss what it means to be a Christian, so they can decide whether to make their own Christian commitment and how they'll express that in their own lives.

Lord God,

I pray that you will guide and support me in being a godparent.

Give me your wisdom and your love.

Help me to be a good example of Christian living

and keep me mindful of my precious godchild [child's name]. Amen.

Heavenly Father,

thank you for the gift of [child's name]

and for all the joy he/she brings us.

Be with her/him on her/his Christian journey

so she/he may come to know our Lord Jesus Christ

as Saviour and friend. Amen.

Q. What's the difference between a baptism and a christening?

A. None, they are just different words for the same thing.

Q. Can we have a private service of baptism?

A. Baptisms usually take place in the church's main service, because they are a public declaration that your child has become part of the church family. It is important that the church congregation is there to support you and welcome your child. However, if personal circumstances make this difficult, talk your parish priest.

Q. What is the right age for baptism?

A. Baptism can happen at any age. What matters is that those concerned are committed to bring up a child as a Christian.

Teenagers and adults may also be baptized. This is celebrated with confirmation by the Bishop. You can only be baptised once, but there are ways of renewing your Christian commitment publicly as an adult - your priest will be able to advise you.

Q. I'm not a regular churchgoer. Can I still have my child baptized?

A. Yes. The Church believes that God's love is available to all, regardless of their background. Your parish priest can talk you through the options: you might prefer to have a Thanksgiving service first and then consider baptism when you have had time to talk through what is being asked of you.

You may also wish to find out more about the Christian faith and what joining the Church involves before you make a decision about baptism. Again, your parish priest can give you guidance.

Q. What does it cost?

A. A Baptism service is free, though there may be a small charge for a certificate. Ask your parish priest.

 

You're welcome to marry in church whatever your beliefs, whether or not you are christened and whether or not you regularly go to church. And, marrying in church has never been easier.

You can marry in a church! You're welcome to marry in the Church of England whatever your beliefs, whether or not you are christened and regardless of whether you go to church or not. It's your church, and we welcome you! A complication will only arise if one of you has been married before, or, if one of you is a foreign national, but there may still be a way forward.

Read more about marriage after divorce or advice for foreign nationals. It is your Vicar's duty to marry you, but also their privilege. When you choose to marry in a church, you are the hosts and the church is your guest. If you invite us to be part of your wedding, we would be delighted to accept. And for such a special day, we offer a special place.

Special day, special place.

We want to make your wedding personal and memorable for you. Churches are special places and there are some things about a church wedding that you just can't get anywhere else. A church wedding will add a spiritual dimension to your marriage. The ceremony includes God and looks to him for help and guidance. God's blessing is the main attraction for many couples, whatever their beliefs. You can make amazing vows, or promises, in a church. You can only make vows this big in a church. These vows, made in public, will help you to stay together and grow together. God and your church are there for you to help you keep your vows.

The Vicar has a very particular role to play in your wedding. They can blend ancient tradition and modern experience to reflect your story. Because of the relationship with the Vicar, your wedding can be made personal, memorable, meaningful and beautiful.

In Church it's marriage in the eyes of God, which makes the commitment a bit stronger, I mean not in yourselves, it doesn't change your feelings, but for some reason it puts that cloud over you– not a nasty cloud, a different cloud. It's more than legal. It's different - it's proper. Church buildings offer outstanding beauty.

Old or new, intimate or grand, our 16,000 churches are some of the nation's most stunning wedding venues, with two-thirds being listed buildings. Church buildings offer centuries of history. Imagine all the couples who have married in your local church, some of whom may well be your family. You can feel you're becoming part of history itself, the bigger plan, by marrying in the same place as your relatives.

We know these sorts of connections can make your day even more special. Read more about how much easier it is to marry in your special church, wherever that may be. For some people, a church simply seems like the proper place to get married. Churches can be described as 'peaceful', 'serene', or having an atmosphere that makes marrying there a particularly special experience.

A funeral is used to mark the end of a person's life here on earth. Family and friends come together to express grief, give thanks for the life lived and commend the person into God's keeping. These can be a small, quiet ceremony or a large occasion in a packed church. Everyone is entitled to either a burial service (funeral) or to have their ashes buried in their local parish churchyard by their local parish priest regardless of whether they attended church or not. Speak to your local vicar for more information, or, if you do not know who your local vicar is please use the search box on the right to find your local Church of England church. If the churchyard has been closed, then the Local Authority will provide alternative places of burial and the minister can carry out the service there instead of the church or crematorium. 

Q. What's the difference between a baptism and a christening?

A. None, they are just different words for the same thing.

Q. Can we have a private service of baptism?

A. Baptisms usually take place in the church's main service, because they are a public declaration that your child has become part of the church family. It is important that the church congregation is there to support you and welcome your child. However, if personal circumstances make this difficult, talk your parish priest.

Q. What is the right age for baptism?

A. Baptism can happen at any age. What matters is that those concerned are committed to bring up a child as a Christian.

Teenagers and adults may also be baptized. This is celebrated with confirmation by the Bishop. You can only be baptised once, but there are ways of renewing your Christian commitment publicly as an adult - your priest will be able to advise you.

Q. I'm not a regular churchgoer. Can I still have my child baptized?

A. Yes. The Church believes that God's love is available to all, regardless of their background. Your parish priest can talk you through the options: you might prefer to have a Thanksgiving service first and then consider baptism when you have had time to talk through what is being asked of you.

You may also wish to find out more about the Christian faith and what joining the Church involves before you make a decision about baptism. Again, your parish priest can give you guidance.

Q. What does it cost?

A. A Baptism service is free, though there may be a small charge for a certificate. Ask your parish priest.

 

St Giles Church is featured in Simon Jenkins book "England's 1000 Best Churches". It was built in around 1247, reputedly by masons who helped build York Minster, using stones that remained after the building of the South Transept of the Minster. St Giles has stood for over 700 years and will probably stand for another 700. It is a classically handsome building, approached through an attractive Churchyard, the perfect setting for your wedding or christening ceremony. Couples love to come back here to relive their special day and show their children and grandchildren where they married.St Giles church is also an attractive place for weddings. You don't have to be from the local area to be married here. A guide booklet is available, inside the Church. We use the "Common Worship" order of service, with hymns from "Mission Praise" and music of "The Addington Service". "The St.Giles Singers" will be singing on the second Sunday of each month and for other special services. Come and discover our beautiful church.

Friends of St. Giles

Skelton, North Yorkshire

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

An Invitation, please be a friend.

You are warmly invited to become a Friend of St. Giles.

Friends was formed in 2009 on the 1st September (St. Giles Day) to endeavour to maintain the building to it`s current high standard.

The church building belongs to all the people of Skelton, not just the congregation and the care of our heritage is the responsibility of the whole community, not just church members.

If you are interested, and need more information please pick up a very informative leaflet from the church or email us at the above address.

Everyone is welcome and we do hope you will become a Friend.

The church of the Holy Evangelists, Shipton by Beningbrough, built in 1849 is a very imposing Victorian building easily visible from the A19 road. The church organises regular coffee mornings in the Community Centre on Saturday mornings, well attended by people from Shipton and the neighbouring villages. It would be lovely to see you there. There is a strong link between the church and the Forest of Galtres Church of England/Methodist primary school in Shipton. Pupils from the school regularly visit the church and attend special church services, and Anglican and Methodists regularly take school assemblies and are represented on the Governing body. Once a month we have joint services with the local Methodist church. We also share with them an afternoon service for the nearby St. Catherine`s Home for the elderly and take a service there every month, accompanied by members of our congrgation. You are warmly invited to visit our church and the village and we look forward to seeing you soon. The clergy for our parish are Rev. Malcolm Wainwright and Rev.Anna Lindley. We have weekly Sunday services and aim to give visitors a warm welcome.. St Giles has stood for over 700 years.

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